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Article Index
Employer Handbook for Statutory Sick Pay
Forms you may need to use
Flowchart - operating the SSP Scheme
Terms used in this guide
SSP daily rates tables
Frequently Asked Questions
New from 6 April 2010
General Information
Time limits for notification of SSP
Has your employee given you the right medical evidence?
Periods of Incapacity for Work (PIW)
Employer Handbook for Statutory Sick Pay
How to work out the relevant period
Paying SSP
When does payment stop?
Recovering SSP
Keeping records
Specific employments
Exceptions to normal conditions for SSP
Are you liable to pay employer's Class 1 NICs on your employee’s earnings?
How to work out Average Weekly Earnings (AWE)
Your employee disagrees with your decision on their SSP entitlement
Incapacity and deemed incapacity
Managing sick absence
Other information that may be useful
Control periods, common illnesses and abbreviations
Tables for linking Periods of Incapacity for Work for SSP
Further help and guidance

Employer Handbook for Statutory Sick Pay

Time limits for notification of SSP

How your employee must tell you For SSP purposes, you cannot insist that your employee notifies you:

  • in person
  • earlier than the first Qualifying Day (QD) in a spell of sickness
  • by a fixed time on the first QD
  • more often than once a week during the sickness
  • on a special form
  • on a medical certificate.

If you wish, you can make one set of rules for the first notification in a spell of sickness and another set of rules for the second and following notifications in the same spell of sickness.

If you don’t make your own rules, your employee must notify you of their incapacity within seven days of their first day of absence.

Employee doesn’t tell you

If your employee doesn’t notify you of sickness absence. within:

  • the time you fixed, or
  • seven days of the first day of incapacity, and
  • if you consider that there was good cause for delay, you must accept that the notification was given correctly if it is given
    • within one month of the time you specify, or in the seven day period after the relevant day(s) of incapacity, or
    • up to 91 days after the relevant day(s) of incapacity, if you are satisfied that it was not reasonably practicable for the employee to notify you within the month.

If you have accepted that the notification was given correctly, your employee will be entitled to SSP from the beginning of their absence as if they had notified you onetime. There is an example of a letter you may wish to use to advise your employee that you consider they are not entitled to SSP for this reason.

Withholding payment for late notification

You can withhold payment of SSP for the period of the delay if the notification is given outside these time limit sand you do not accept there was good cause for delay.If you decide to withhold payment you should treat the date of the late notification as the first Qualifying Day for SSP.

For example, your employee is sick from Sunday to Saturday and their agreed QDs are Monday to Friday. Your rules are that employees must notify you of sickness on the first QD of sick absence, in this case Monday. If they delay notification without good cause until Wednesday, you could withhold payment of SSP for Monday and Tuesday. There is an example of a letter you may wish to use to advise your employee that you consider they are not entitled to SSP for this reason.



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